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Thread: Yukon Hunt Report

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    wanaukee, wisconsin
    Posts
    60

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    stunningly inspirational...thanks for the pictures and the narrative and the effort...hunting buddy

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Kiowa,Co.
    Posts
    2,747

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    Way to go, Timberline. Sounds like ya had a great hunt and some good memories. Awesome country.......Maybe before I get too old.....Look forward to seeing the rest of the pics sometime. (by the way,shot the 204 today.unscathed) Don

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Marquette, MI
    Posts
    657

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    That sounds like the hunt of a lifetime! Congratulations!

    Sawtooth, The camo in the fourth photo looks to be Cabela's microtex in outfitter camo. Fifth pic is of Cabela's berber fleece in outfitter camo.

    Timberline, how did you like the microtex and how windproof is it? Thanks, Ian
    "At least once every human being should have to run for his life - to teach him that milk does not come from the supermarket, that safety does not come from policemen, and that news is not something that happens to other people." - Robert Heinlein

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Near Canon City, CO
    Posts
    6,488

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    5X5,

    That was my guess, too. I have been eyeballing the Microtex clothing in Outfitter Camo. There are also some interesting wool fleece garments in the Outfitter Camo pattern in Cabela's, too, in addition to the regular fleece stuff. Now, if only they would make MT 050 rain gear in Outfitter Camo, we'd have it made! I'd like to hear from anyone with field experience with the Microtex and/or the wool fleece clothing. Is the wool fleece reasonably compressible?
    "Me got no house; me all time moving; light fire, make tent, sleep; all time go hunt, how have house?"

    --Dersu Uzala
    Sihote'-Alin Range, Ussuria, 1902



    www.tenkaratracks.com
    http://fishrigs.com/

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Yukon
    Posts
    240

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    Timberline-
    God's country, ain't it?
    And there is absolutely NOTHING better than Sheep ribs over an open fire...

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Golden, Co. USA
    Posts
    4,054

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    God's country indeed. And an outstounding account of an outstanding hunt--the best ones are characterized by a combination of hard work and serendipidy. Well done, Mr. Timberline! And I'll certainly second Yukon Hunter's observation about the goodness of sheep ribs over an open fire. The hunt points to living life at the very top.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,598

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    Thanks Timberline! Pure inspiration!!!

    Dave
    Don't just do something, sit there and think.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,819

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    Sawtooth,

    The clothing in question is indeed Cabela's Microtex in Outfitter Camo and the jacket in the sheep photo is Cabela's Berber Fleece Camp Coat with Windstop in the same camo pattern.

    I started using Cabela's Microtex pants and shirts for all but really warm weather hunting about 7 or 8 years ago and have become sold on the stuff. It's a synthetic that's light, warm and wears like irons. Since discovering Micro-Tex, I've sold nearly all of my wool hunting clothing. Wool is soft, quiet and traditional. But it is also bulky, heavier than lead when wet, colder as ice when wet(whoever stareted the old wives tale that wool is warm when wet should be shot) and takes about two years to dry out in a hunting camp. I once used wool exclusively when hunting cool or cold weather from Alaska and Canada to Wyoming and Colorado. But no more! I've discovered that today's better synthetics – like Cabela's Microtex – are far superior. Such synthetics are lighter, compress better, are less bulky and restrictive during climbs, don't soak up water like wool, don't get oppressively heavy (like wool) when wet, and dry out with surprising speed right in the field when the rain stops.

    I'd also add that Cabela's Microtex is the best-wearing hunting fabric I've ever owned. I have Microtex pants that are now 7 to 8 years old that have seen lots of mountains in the Lower 48, Canada and Alaska and still look almost new. In short, Microtex is amazing stuff. I love it.

    I also really like the Outfitter Camo pattern. It's exceptional nearly everywhere. Most of today's camo patterns, I think, are much too dark and the patterns are much too small. Outfitter Camo really blends in up close and at a distance.

    For serious mountain and plains hunting in temperatures from 70 to 20 degrees, I go layered. Polypro brief underwear and T-shirt (or heavier polypro top and long underwear when the mercury dips) as a base layer. Then Microtex shirt and plants. Then Cabela's Berber Fleece Camp Jacket with Windstop. I've tried all sorts of hunting jackets over the years for mountain hunting, but I like this one best. I like it so much, that I recently bought a second, identical one to keep as a backup. This jacket is soft, silent, and is surprisingly light and compressible. When the need arises, its also surprising warm, stops with wind (much better than just fleece) and the collars zips all the way up for when it's really cold and the wind is blowing. It's a great hunting jacket that's very packable – the best I've found to date.

    The next layer is raingear and I wish I could report that I've found the perfect stuff. Raingear, I believe, is the most confusing area of hunting apparel today. There are so many miracle fabrics and high-tech names that it makes my head hurt. I sort the whole mess into two basic categories: Laminated/Breathable Raingear (GoreTex, MTO50, Rain Suede, etc.) and 100% Waterproof Raingear (rubber raingear, Frogg Toggs, Helly Hanson, Cabela's Micro Pack Raingear, etc.).

    I've found that the Laminated/Breathable stuff is great for mild rain, drizzle, mist and snow. But it is a bit heavy for serious packing or sheep mountain climbs and it will get wet through in driving or extended rains and it will eventually soak up much water to get heavier than sin in really wet weather. I've had great luck with much more packable and waterproof raingear, like Cabela's Micro-Pack Rainwear, when I backpack or plan to hike or climb long distances. On this most recent Yukon hunt, I hedged by bet. I brought along a GoreTex Parka for camp and to be tied behind my saddle for the trail. But in my pack was a complete set of Cabela's light, compressible, 100% waterproof Micro Pack Rainwear. That much lighter raingear was my top hunting layer for bad weather or just cold wind. It works great for that, is 100% waterproof and is so much lighter and more compressible than a full suit of the laminated/breathable stuff.

    The real trick in serious, mobile hunting is to be properly layered, and to take things off or add appropriate layers as the need arises.
    "Don't let the things you can't do, stop you from doing the things you can do."

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Formerly Golden CO....
    Posts
    1,057

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    Id really like to see a few pics of outfitter camo at a few different distances... say 50, 100, 200, and 300 yards.

    I completly agree that most camo, especially hunting camo, is too dark and the pattern just turns into one dark brown blob at any distance much further than the maker wants to show you in the magazine ads.

    There are a few commercial patterns out there that I like, and a few that I have drawn up and would like to have made... none are "photo realistic" or try and immitate the background. Just break up the outline with natural colors.
    If you love wealth more than liberty... We ask not your council or your arms... May posterity forget that you were our countrymen.
    - Samuel Adams

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,819

    Default Re: Yukon Hunt Report

    Yukon Hunter,

    Sheep ribs (boiled for 3 hours and then slowly roasted over willow coals) was, as you pointed out, spectacular...hot or cold. They were great right off the fire, and I'll long remember riding a big buckskin horse as we crossed the Snake River the next day, reins in one hand and finger-licking cold sheep ribs in the other, gnawing my way through a riding trail lunch as we headed upriver.

    But as good as those sheep ribs were, I thought that the liver from my ram was even better. I like game liver and that ram's liver, cut thin and dipped in milk and eggs, dredged in floor and then fried slowly in sheep fat in a cast iron pan over an open fire with sautéed onions was to die for. It melted in your mouth.

    Then there was the meat from my grizzly. We took backstraps and hind quarters. The wrangler soaked/marinated the backstraps in orange juice for about six hours – to tenderize it, he said. Then he stir-fried big cubes of it in sheep fat in a cast pan over our fire and added the cubes to noodles. Wow, was that grizzly meat good! Extremely tender, with a wonderful texture and taste.

    Makes me hungry just writing about it.
    "Don't let the things you can't do, stop you from doing the things you can do."

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