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The 14�r - Page 3
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Thread: The 14�r

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    La Grande
    Posts
    684

    Default Re: The 14r

    Bender,
    Off topic a little, but those spotting scope pockets, will they ever come with the long zip instead of top?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Arvada CO
    Posts
    156

    Default Re: The 14r

    Haven't heard a call for that one yet. On the Woodsman and 14er the compression straps would be held in by the daisy chain on the bag and that might hinder access. I will have to think about how to pull that off cleanly. The attachment points on bottom would keep from pulling the zipper back to top without using your other hand. I will need to chew on that one for a while Hayes. Good question though
    Eric Bender
    -eric@kifaru.net

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    La Grande
    Posts
    684

    Default Re: The 14r

    Quote Originally Posted by Bender View Post
    Haven't heard a call for that one yet. On the Woodsman and 14er the compression straps would be held in by the daisy chain on the bag and that might hinder access. I will have to think about how to pull that off cleanly. The attachment points on bottom would keep from pulling the zipper back to top without using your other hand. I will need to chew on that one for a while Hayes. Good question though
    Thanks! The 14r looks good with the spotter pockets.

  4. #24

    Default Re: The 14r

    Has there been any thought to possibly adding a few sections of molle to the sides of the 14r? Not a ton, just enough to add an ifak, radio pouch or similar for the guys who would use it in more of a duty/tactical roll. I am already planning on a 14r as is, but if one were to come available with a few sections of molle, I would be on it like white on rice.

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: The 14r

    Quote Originally Posted by Bender View Post
    Hey Zane,
    What kind of planning goes into doing that kind of trip in Austria? Any permits or do you just need the plane ticket and a ride to the trail head? I know they have some interesting laws on setting up campsites and the amount of time you can spend there.
    Hey Eric, I planned the trip through the Deutscher Alpenverein (DAV). They helped decide where to go, how to call the hut for reservations and also provided maps. I had to figure out what trains to take from Munich to Imst and then what bus to take to the trailhead. The trailhead was remote, but the bus ran like clockwork. When I hiked out, the bus showed up right on schedule. The hut was nice: full hot dinner and breakfast, beer and a shower. It was relatively inexpensive for the hut - I think I paid 80euro or so for two nights including full dinner, beer and breakfast. The train and bus fare was close to that as well.
    As far as actual backcountry camping like we do, I dont know what that entails there. Ive seen a ton of pictures of backcountry trips from my German colleagues, but most were in other countries. They have huts everywhere.

    Here's a pic of the hut :Name:  Taschachhaus.jpg
Views: 216
Size:  7.6 KB

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: The 14r

    One clarification: DAV is a German Alpine club.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Near Canon City, CO
    Posts
    6,712

    Default Re: The 14r

    Eric,

    The Koala Lite is so useful for many different applications. Some time ago I was saddened to see the Koala Lite discontinued. If there's a piece of gear you would ever think about resurrecting, it should be the Koala Lite as well as it's two different front pockets. For concealed chest carry of a weapon, and for instant access to small gear, a chest rig cannot be beat. It's compatible with all of your packs with the matching lifters. I often wonder why it was taken off the inventory.

    Mine continues to serve me well on a daily basis while guiding, with either a .44 Mag or a 357 tucked neatly in the rear compartment, and a small assortment of fly boxes and fly fishing accessories in the front pocket. During hunting seasons, it's full of all sorts of required gear.

    It's a go-to piece of Kifaru gear!
    "Me got no house; me all time moving; light fire, make tent, sleep; all time go hunt, how have house?"

    --Dersu Uzala
    Sihote'-Alin Range, Ussuria, 1902



    www.tenkaratracks.com

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Centennial, CO
    Posts
    1,869

    Default Re: The 14r

    I've got to Agree with Sawtooth on that. SOE makes a pretty nice, light rig, but the owner's reputation for being horrible about delivering stuff people have paid for prevents me from suggesting it to anyone except for 2nd hand, and then, pop a stitch, you're screwed. I really like the Koala, but I love the Koala Lite, so the Koala doesn't get carried much anymore.... And both carry that 5" XD converted to 460 Rowland with another almost 2" of muzzle brake easily...

    I also agree with Joe on the spotting scope pockets. I have the same preference between my long pockets, the side zips allow better access and better stuffing... For a while I was using them for carrying food (they hang well in trees to keep away from mice, or whatever) to keep from stinking up my main pack..
    "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects." -Robert A. Heinlein
    "Count your blessings and you will never finish" - Fr. Jim Babb, SJ

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    FBG, TX
    Posts
    1,356

    Default Re: The 14r

    Zane and Bender,

    It's not really allowed to camp in the Alps, and most of Europe for that matter, like we do in the Rockies, Sierras, etc. The only camping that is really allowed is "emergency" camping, i.e. if one were to get lost or caught by a storm and couldn't get out or to the hut. Now; people do camp, but it's technically illegal. Enforcement is more of the "honor system" as there is a lot of land and very few forest rangers. There are many private camp sites through out the Alps/Europe where one can set-up a tent or park their RV/caravan. Many German families have their caravans set-up semi-permanently in these camp sites and vacation there through out the year. These camp sites usually are well developed and have many recreation and entertainment options.

    The trail system in Europe is amazing. One can walk on clearly marked trails from one side of Europe to the other and stay in a hut/hostel/gsthaus every night. Prices are very reasonable and include breakfast with dinner usually available for a small price too. Most of these trails are pilgrimage routes and have been in use for a 1000 years.

    I'm sure some of our European colleagues can add more detail and/or clarify my response. I researched several hut-to-hut trips, when I was in Germany, but never actually did it. It's two of my biggest regrets, not doing a hut-to-hut and not going to Scotland.

    Take care,
    "Heal with steel"
    Buckaroomedic

    "Noli nothis permittere te terere."

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: The 14r

    Yeah, I have to agree, the hut system is pretty amazing there. It was really a lodge, not a hut like the 10th mountain system in Colorado for example. I hope to do it again someday...

    [/QUOTE]The trail system in Europe is amazing. One can walk on clearly marked trails from one side of Europe to the other and stay in a hut/hostel/gsthaus every night. Prices are very reasonable and include breakfast with dinner usually available for a small price too. Most of these trails are pilgrimage routes and have been in use for a 1000 years.

    I'm sure some of our European colleagues can add more detail and/or clarify my response. I researched several hut-to-hut trips, when I was in Germany, but never actually did it. It's two of my biggest regrets, not doing a hut-to-hut and not going to Scotland.

    Take care,[/QUOTE]

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