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Thread: A Philosophy on Life

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Golden, Co. USA
    Posts
    4,155

    Default A Philosophy on Life

    While digging in my scattered "files" for maps and support material for my "under construction" Road Trip Thread I more or less tripped over this little essay. I have no idea where it came from, who wrote it (it wasn't me) or how old it is. But it may bring a smile to your face...it did to mine.



    A philosophy professor stood before his class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a large empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks about two inches in diameter.

    He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed it was. So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks. Then he asked his students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

    The students laughed.

    The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. "Now", said the professor, "I want you to recognize that this is your life. The rocks are important things--your family, your partner, your health, your children--things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

    "the pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else. The small stuff. If you put the sand into the jar first there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out dancing. There will always be time to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal. Take care of the rocks first--the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.

    But then...a student took the jar that the the other students and the professor agreed was full, and proceeded to pour in a glass of beer. Of course the beer filled the remaining spaces within the jar, making the jar truly full.

    The moral of this tale is this: No matter how full your life is, there is always room for BEER!


    Yikes! This is the first time I've done any real typing since the eye surgery that I'm still recovering from. Difficlult it is, as Master Yoda would say. Y'all might want to give me a bit of slack on getting my Road Trip Thread up.


    Hope you've enjoyed this small bit of wisdom in the meantime....


    Patrick

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    408

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Yes Sir! I am good,all the BEST!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    That was an amusing twist on an old anecdote. Can't wait for your road trip tales.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,282

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Good tale, anxiously awaiting the road tales.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    eugene, oregon
    Posts
    4,631

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    The great thing about beer is it is great when you drink then it passes through and you can drink more! Get better Patrick (drink a beer it can't hurt your recovery).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Cool message, I'm going to use it
    Mark
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    While digging in my scattered "files" for maps and support material for my "under construction" Road Trip Thread I more or less tripped over this little essay. I have no idea where it came from, who wrote it (it wasn't me) or how old it is. But it may bring a smile to your face...it did to mine.



    A philosophy professor stood before his class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a large empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks about two inches in diameter.

    He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed it was. So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks. Then he asked his students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

    The students laughed.

    The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. "Now", said the professor, "I want you to recognize that this is your life. The rocks are important things--your family, your partner, your health, your children--things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

    "the pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else. The small stuff. If you put the sand into the jar first there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out dancing. There will always be time to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal. Take care of the rocks first--the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.

    But then...a student took the jar that the the other students and the professor agreed was full, and proceeded to pour in a glass of beer. Of course the beer filled the remaining spaces within the jar, making the jar truly full.

    The moral of this tale is this: No matter how full your life is, there is always room for BEER!


    Yikes! This is the first time I've done any real typing since the eye surgery that I'm still recovering from. Difficlult it is, as Master Yoda would say. Y'all might want to give me a bit of slack on getting my Road Trip Thread up.


    Hope you've enjoyed this small bit of wisdom in the meantime....


    Patrick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Near Canon City, CO
    Posts
    6,671

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Time passes very quickly. The older I get, the more I realize this. Grab every significant moment you can, because once they're gone, they're gone. This is especially true with your children.
    "Me got no house; me all time moving; light fire, make tent, sleep; all time go hunt, how have house?"

    --Dersu Uzala
    Sihote'-Alin Range, Ussuria, 1902



    www.tenkaratracks.com

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