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A Philosophy on Life
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Golden, Co. USA
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    4,162

    Default A Philosophy on Life

    While digging in my scattered "files" for maps and support material for my "under construction" Road Trip Thread I more or less tripped over this little essay. I have no idea where it came from, who wrote it (it wasn't me) or how old it is. But it may bring a smile to your face...it did to mine.



    A philosophy professor stood before his class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a large empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks about two inches in diameter.

    He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed it was. So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks. Then he asked his students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

    The students laughed.

    The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. "Now", said the professor, "I want you to recognize that this is your life. The rocks are important things--your family, your partner, your health, your children--things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

    "the pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else. The small stuff. If you put the sand into the jar first there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out dancing. There will always be time to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal. Take care of the rocks first--the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.

    But then...a student took the jar that the the other students and the professor agreed was full, and proceeded to pour in a glass of beer. Of course the beer filled the remaining spaces within the jar, making the jar truly full.

    The moral of this tale is this: No matter how full your life is, there is always room for BEER!


    Yikes! This is the first time I've done any real typing since the eye surgery that I'm still recovering from. Difficlult it is, as Master Yoda would say. Y'all might want to give me a bit of slack on getting my Road Trip Thread up.


    Hope you've enjoyed this small bit of wisdom in the meantime....


    Patrick

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Yes Sir! I am good,all the BEST!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    226

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    That was an amusing twist on an old anecdote. Can't wait for your road trip tales.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,283

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Good tale, anxiously awaiting the road tales.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    eugene, oregon
    Posts
    4,641

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    The great thing about beer is it is great when you drink then it passes through and you can drink more! Get better Patrick (drink a beer it can't hurt your recovery).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Cool message, I'm going to use it
    Mark
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    While digging in my scattered "files" for maps and support material for my "under construction" Road Trip Thread I more or less tripped over this little essay. I have no idea where it came from, who wrote it (it wasn't me) or how old it is. But it may bring a smile to your face...it did to mine.



    A philosophy professor stood before his class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a large empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks about two inches in diameter.

    He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed it was. So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks. Then he asked his students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

    The students laughed.

    The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. "Now", said the professor, "I want you to recognize that this is your life. The rocks are important things--your family, your partner, your health, your children--things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

    "the pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else. The small stuff. If you put the sand into the jar first there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out dancing. There will always be time to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal. Take care of the rocks first--the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.

    But then...a student took the jar that the the other students and the professor agreed was full, and proceeded to pour in a glass of beer. Of course the beer filled the remaining spaces within the jar, making the jar truly full.

    The moral of this tale is this: No matter how full your life is, there is always room for BEER!


    Yikes! This is the first time I've done any real typing since the eye surgery that I'm still recovering from. Difficlult it is, as Master Yoda would say. Y'all might want to give me a bit of slack on getting my Road Trip Thread up.


    Hope you've enjoyed this small bit of wisdom in the meantime....


    Patrick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Near Canon City, CO
    Posts
    6,712

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Time passes very quickly. The older I get, the more I realize this. Grab every significant moment you can, because once they're gone, they're gone. This is especially true with your children.
    "Me got no house; me all time moving; light fire, make tent, sleep; all time go hunt, how have house?"

    --Dersu Uzala
    Sihote'-Alin Range, Ussuria, 1902



    www.tenkaratracks.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Washington, Olympic mtns
    Posts
    1,324

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Cancer,especially the lethal kind have made me empty most of the sand. My kids are not safe in their mothers home and that has been a four year long battle to fix. Im working now for retirement toys, March will me my last month and I am going out on medical retirement. I will just have enough to get by on and gas money to drive places. I dont know how much time I have left, a year? maybe less? maybe more? I was supposed to be gone in two months but that was 18 months ago. I lost 35 pounds in three weeks and gained it back but not until cannabis was in the equation, dont believe in drugs but as medicine it literally saved my life. Now I am doing weekly chemo and only working part time, 3-4 days a week. Doing chemo on Tuesdays and recovering by Friday. Back to a work out routine four days a week. Cross fit but no more trail running. I am hiking and shooting my single action 480 to keep my skills honed. My rocks are my children, the jar is time, my health is the smaller pebbles which I need to pay more attention to which is why I am retiring. My job will be to stay healthy as long as possible, work towards remission, mentor my children on weekends, take them camping every week, love on them and train them to keep away from the drugs their mother and step dad are taking. If possible I will get custody, because of their behavior things are heading that way. If I do I am taking them out of the city and back to Lake Cushman where they love to be, just a couple miles from a Wilderness boundary and federal forests. This is and always has been a rescue mission for my kids. I have slim odds against pancreatic cancer but Dr Chen has survivors that are past 20 years. Im moving in the direction of remission but its a struggle. I cant fight guys here in the prison system anymore and frankly the environment and toxins in it at my job are the probable culprit of my cancer, that and stress. I want all of you to rethink your diets, eat all organic...this means hunt your ass off. Get away from the modern world and its poisons, focus on your relationships, love your children, get the hell outside to play, mentor your children so we have a new generation of real Americans, patriots, freedom and independence lovers, kids with dreams and drive. I dont know how much time I have but... you bet your ass it will be full of kids, guns, fly rods, fishing, hikes, campfires,history lessons, mentoring, reading, breathing, writing and photographs. This will be my new life, the one I hope gives me time to see my 7 year old grow to adult hood, my daughter become a woman, my other sons to have purpose in their lives and to understand how to live well. Im sorry for the long rant but Patrick hit a nerve with this and its a good thing. Stop looking down, live your life, focus on rocks and pebbles....sand is just for bags to steady your rifle.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Centennial, CO
    Posts
    1,869

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Glad to read what you wrote Glenn and it answered questions asked in my private message just a bit ago.
    "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects." -Robert A. Heinlein
    "Count your blessings and you will never finish" - Fr. Jim Babb, SJ

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Near Canon City, CO
    Posts
    6,712

    Default Re: A Philosophy on Life

    Thank you for your latest post Glenn, and know that I am praying for you. You have solid focus, and have written words to live by, not only for yourself, but all of us. God bless you.
    "Me got no house; me all time moving; light fire, make tent, sleep; all time go hunt, how have house?"

    --Dersu Uzala
    Sihote'-Alin Range, Ussuria, 1902



    www.tenkaratracks.com

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