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Dale Lindsley
12-03-2004, 11:06 AM
I have never been able to extend my tipi/paratipi poles to the detente holes that have the marks by them. I wonder whether this is caused by insufficient setback on the stakes, or rather, correct setback from a too-tightly-stretched original steak position. I wonder whether Patrick or anyone else could give me the exact measurement between front and back steaks, and between the two side steaks on an 8-man that has been pitched "perfectly". That way I don't have to use setbacks, which, depending on how tight you pull in the first place, can give varying distances between the steaks.

Patrick
12-03-2004, 01:00 PM
Dale--

I am going to try to remember to get you that measurement next time I'm out in an 8 man and figure I have it pitched "perfectly". The word is in quotes to indicate somewhat the imprecision of such. The "raise to here" index on our center poles are not exactly hard and fast. When you think about the pretty vast expanse of fabric and space comprising a pitched 8 man tipi, and then compare it to the really tiny margin of "error" indicated by that little spec of height targeted on the center pole you can perhaps see that YOUR SPECIFIC TENT might have wound up being sewn such that its "sweet spot" resides one or two holes below or above that target indicator. Which is NOT a serious thing. What you are really after in pitching your tipi is straight sidewalls. This will indicate "perfect" pitch for that tipi. Do the instructional set-backs, raise the pole 'til it's pretty darn tight (I spit on my hands to get the right amount of purchase) then pull the remaining stakes out and down WITH ABOUT A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FORCE (NOT real difficult for a man, let me remind you), and peg them rotating from sides, alternately, around to the doors. That should give that "bounce a silver dollar off it" pitch that'll stand up to anything.

What think? How far off from the little indicator are you now? Is it consistent from pitch to pitch? Are you getting straight, not dished, sidewalls. BTW, often the ground layout will result in SOME dishing somewhere around the perimeter of the tipi--it's the overall, time-after-time results I'm asking you about.

Patrick
12-03-2004, 01:08 PM
OK Dale, in re-reading your question above I'm going to ask one more question of you. How hard ARE you stretching the "original stake position"? This of course referes to the stretch between the front/rear stake loops--thru the doors, so to speak. Make that stretch just snug--about 50 pounds. OK? You'll know if this initial setting is fouling the whole process if the tension on the tipi, when pitched, is felt tightly when you zip/unzip the doors. If the zipper is under stress you need to make the setback thru the doors acouple three inches greater than you are doing now. As you can see, this will also give you more pole-raising height.

A little technology, a little art--the big tipis are something of both.

Dale Lindsley
12-03-2004, 01:53 PM
OK. Thanks. I think I am streching too tight (as tight as I possibly can) on the "original stake position". This is a holdover from my old Sierra Designs Glacier. The zippers end up tight and the tent ends up dished (still looks and functions fine). I'm thinking I'll get a piece of that plastic twine that weighs nothing and doesn't stretch at all and put a loop at one end and a mark at the other to space the first two pegs consistently? I've been streching out all of my stake-outs as tight as I can get them. Maybe I need to ease up a bit on those too. Thanks again Patrick.

Patrick
12-03-2004, 03:40 PM
Dale--

You are welcome. I think we have you on the right track. I'll suggest you ease off in the directions we've discussed, and see what results you get--I think they'll be significant. So much so that you'll forget about the complications of twine and such. Remember to spit on your hands so you get good purchase raising that center pole. Kinda satisfying, spitting on one's hands, ya know.

Dale Lindsley
12-03-2004, 04:06 PM
No, I didn't know, but I'll take your word for it and give it a try. The cartoon characters always used to do it.