PDA

View Full Version : DIY: Grommet Kits



never.truly.lost
08-05-2013, 10:12 AM
Good day Guys,

Does anyone have any recommendations? I picked up a Coglans brand kit from the local outdoor shop and was going to practice on some extra 1000d I had laying around, but the punch is nowhere near fine enough to punch through.

Basically practicing to put a single grommet on a G1 E&E as it doesn't have them but only really need 1.

That being said, does anyone have any kits they have used that you would recommend? I know there are some gear makers on the boards here and wanted to see what you guys are using.

Cheers
Andy

robcollins
08-05-2013, 12:52 PM
I'd recommend cutting the hole to fit and burning the frayed edges before installing grommets. Even with a grommet in there, fraying can continue...

I'm not sure how to recommend cutting the holes neatly, I have an inkling that if I did it, I'd find a piece of pipe to sharpen on the grinder, then heat it with a torch to cut the hole and burn at the same time...

I'm curious how everyone else is doing this!!!

sab
08-05-2013, 02:03 PM
NTL:

Seattle Fabrics is where I've bought grommets and tools to install them:

http://www.seattlefabrics.com/gromsnap.html

The C.S. Osborne tools are pretty good, and there are different tools for different users (hobbyists vs. production). They even sell the black grommets.

Regards,
Scott

MojoSlim
08-05-2013, 02:12 PM
Mine came from Wally World. Sad thing is, they don't carry the one I originally bought. It has a punch that I've pounded through cordura (put a scrap of 2x4 under the fabric and have at it). I don't particularly like the size of these, nor the brass coloring.

I also have grommet kits (actually, rivets) from knifekits.com, for making kydex accessories. I haven't used them with fabric (only kydex, and I drill those holes out) but I wonder if the sharpened rivet folding punch might also work as a fabric punch? In any case, I really like the "Journeyman" Rivet/Eyelet Flaring set from Knifekits.

The one I got from Wally world looked to be more of the design that sab posted above, but a much cheaper item. I'm not sure what that cheapness corresponds to in terms of longevity, as I've only needed to use my Wally World version to put 8 groms on a tarp.

Keep us posted on what you decide on, and what technique you use for making the hole. Best of luck on your E+E project. Be careful, though, gear modding can become quite addictive. :)

billybass
08-05-2013, 03:18 PM
I use a piece of scrap leather under the fabric when using the supplied punch. I'm working mostly with waxed canvas. I think I would just melt a hole in Cordura with a soldering iron or a heated nail.

Piolet
08-05-2013, 03:38 PM
I've been using the technique of getting the hole-cutting die red hot with a propane torch and then burning the hole in the fabric (mostly I'm putting grommets in nylon) for years. It works great, and, as mentioned, it eliminates the frayed edges.

I've found that when putting grommets in nylon (since the fabric tends to be thin) that there are several advantages to putting a spacer made of either leather or some thick fabric on either side. The thick spacer keeps the outer edges of the grommet from cutting into the nylon. It also give the grommet something sturdy to "clamp" to, and eliminates the grommet "spinning" from looseness (without the spacers, if you hammer down the grommet tight enough to eliminate the spinning, you risk cutting into the nylon).

Since most local hardware stores, fabric shops, WalMart, etc, only sell grommets up to about 3/8 diameter, I've found that there are several specialty stores online that will sell larger grommets and in a variety of metals and finishes. Just Google Grommet.


I'd recommend cutting the hole to fit and burning the frayed edges before installing grommets. Even with a grommet in there, fraying can continue...

I'm not sure how to recommend cutting the holes neatly, I have an inkling that if I did it, I'd find a piece of pipe to sharpen on the grinder, then heat it with a torch to cut the hole and burn at the same time...

I'm curious how everyone else is doing this!!!

Ralph
08-05-2013, 03:45 PM
Small grommets or eyelets will not work on fabrics, they will all pull out. Use Kydex grommets on Kydex only and eyelets only on leather.

If you want to punch the hole, chuck the dull punch in a large drill chuck and sharpen with a file or abrasive cloth while spinning. To work right the punch has to be razor sharp. You can also use the punch, unsharpened as most are, on synthetic fabrics, by heating it and melting the hole. A thick piece of glass (glass shops have scraps they will give you) or the underside of a Pyrex baking dish make a good backing for this. Twist the hot punch as it melts through the fabric. Use an insulated handle or pliers to hold the hot punch.

The best way is the sailmaker's method. Sailmakers use a sharp-edge, triangular stab-awl with the largest measurement the size of the grommet. Lacking that, I use a small, very sharp chisel to cut an X in the fabric. Work the grommet into this and set with a proper setter. You can use the tiny setters included in many kits but the best is the iron conical anvil with the iron punch. I use 1/4" grommets almost exclusively and have them in brass and black.

I use grommets in three places: as drain holes, for drawstrings on bags or packs made from heavy canvas or Cordura and on tents to hold the pointy end of a tent pole. For other places I use sewn (bartacked) loops made of gutted or intact 550 cord or narrow webbing.