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widowshooter
03-18-2013, 04:12 PM
What do you guys do for year round fitness? What keeps you motivated to keep doing a workout or workouts each day? Why isn't there a fitness thread on the forum board?

Take-a-knee
03-18-2013, 05:36 PM
You have to go over to the backpack hunting forum at 24hrcampfire for that skirmish. IE, the Powerlifters vs the Runners. Seriously, I think Crossfit, or something quite similar, should be the baseline program that EVERYONE, hunter or not, should do for most of the year. Running isn't a fitness program, neither is cycling, IMO. "Cardio-only" pursuits are a poor method to achieve real fitness, and they are less effective as one ages, IMO.

MojoSlim
03-18-2013, 06:14 PM
You have to go over to the backpack hunting forum at 24hrcampfire for that skirmish. IE, the Powerlifters vs the Runners. Seriously, I think Crossfit, or something quite similar, should be the baseline program that EVERYONE, hunter or not, should do for most of the year. Running isn't a fitness program, neither is cycling, IMO. "Cardio-only" pursuits are a poor method to achieve real fitness, and they are less effective as one ages, IMO.

Hey TAK, we have some good skirmishes on here, too :)

I'm thinking of the "Extreme" Hunting training thread that Bushcraft posted pre hunting season last year. Really made for a lively discussion.

ozarkrambler
03-18-2013, 06:33 PM
In answer to your question, I do a mixture of p90x and insanity, I also throw in a few walks every week carrying my rifle and some sort of pack, adding weight as hunting season approaches.

My motivation, its to hard to get back in shape once you get there, especially as one gets older. Plus I refuse to let my kids outwalk, outshoot, or carry more weight than me....at least until I turn 70.

Tevo
03-18-2013, 07:09 PM
Crossfit and some supplemental powerlifting, backpacking and some running.

Sawtooth
03-18-2013, 08:38 PM
Trail running X four days per week of varying difficulty and distance, weight lifting X three days per week, and hiking with varying weights in a backpack once a week. I do that until summer when I'm pretty much backpacking or hiking all the time. In the winter I throw in some backcountry Nordic skiing. It seems to get the job done.

Take-a-knee
03-18-2013, 08:52 PM
Here is a link to Rippetoe's barbell strength standards. A reasonable goal/standard for a middle-aged backpack hunter, IMO, would be to meet the Intermediate level standards for your body weight:

http://push-hard.blogspot.com/2009/10/basic-strength-standards-for-adult-men.html

Running standard? How about 800m repeats, with 2min between 800's. 3:30 or less each 800, or a sub 7min mile. Also a sub 24min 5K time.

10 dead-hang pullups.

robcollins
03-18-2013, 09:00 PM
You have to go over to the backpack hunting forum at 24hrcampfire for that skirmish. IE, the Powerlifters vs the Runners. Seriously, I think Crossfit, or something quite similar, should be the baseline program that EVERYONE, hunter or not, should do for most of the year. Running isn't a fitness program, neither is cycling, IMO. "Cardio-only" pursuits are a poor method to achieve real fitness, and they are less effective as one ages, IMO.
Sez you. Obviously you've never logged a 5,000' day of climbing and never pedaled a 36 lb full suspension bike 60 mph down a ski slope. My insulin pump sensor sure tells me I'm in WAY better shape with 4-5 hours per week on the bike, as does my ability to hump a ruck plus a 4 year old kid.

That said, throwing in some tabata burpees or tabata hang cleans adds a nice spin, but don't get carried away, a 65 lb bar can leave a neat pattern on your nose...

Take-a-knee
03-19-2013, 08:06 AM
No one ever got placed in a nursing home because their 5K time was too slow. People get put in them everyday because of their inability to extend their hips. The aerobic energy pathway is only one of three, and, once the other two are allowed to diminish, will become useless. The average man or woman in their 50's, and virtually all in their 60's, can't get up off of a couch without using their hands on their knees because they are too weak. They are a LOT closer to a walker than they realize. A person who can't deadlift his bodyweight is a weakling, regardless of how far or fast he can run or bike.

widowshooter
03-19-2013, 09:21 AM
I have about 165 guys that work from me, all in various ages from 18-40 and the difference in their physical abilities is jaw dropping. They are given two hours to work out each morning, yet most of them can't do more than 20 pushups and forget about pull-ups. The generation behind mine is a bit embarrasing personnally. I like ozarkrambler's philosophy, I am the same way, I push myself so others can't outdo me. So far its worked. I have realized though, that as I get older, I need to be smarter about my diet and recovery techniques. I walk with a pack on every other day and do a crossfit work the days I don't walk. Each afternoon I am starting to hit the pool before I go home. I would like to get into some sort of adventure type racing, I just don't have the cash to put up the entry fee or most of the equipment. The money I have left over usually goes toward my hunting fund. I will also say that it is getting harder and harder to find folks who enjoy walking with a pack and working out as hard as I do, but the search continues.

firecog
03-19-2013, 10:01 AM
I love cycling and have done it for years and think it's a great way to get and stay in shape. It's true however, that it needs to be supplemented which I have always done over the years.
Recently, I started out doing the Big Mountain Fitness program from mountain athlete, and after going through that a couple times I started subscribing to the Operator Sessions on their sister site military athlete.
http://www.mountainathlete.com/
http://militaryathlete.com/
I am really loving their programs and think they are put together a little better than crossfit. Yes, you're buying the programs or paying a subscription, but no doubt,they are worth every penny.

rhunter424
03-19-2013, 10:08 AM
Any of you that have dogs may consider this as it's worked out for me to fill the gaps in times where I don't have a lot of time to work out. One thing I'm consistently doing day after day is walking the dog. He loves to walk and doesn't care if it's rain/shine/snow/windy/etc. He's like the energizer bunny and can't stand to lose a race and neither can I.

We go out on a couple walks a day for a couple miles. I carry a pack with varying weight in it (nothing too heavy that I can't quickly jog) and I make him my pace maker on a static lead. Up hills, down hills, etc.

This exercises benefit is a couple-fold: Dog stays in shape, I get exercise, and I get an opportunity to dial in any gear in anticipation of hiking with it.

Just add a little resistance to your day to day activities.

robcollins
03-19-2013, 11:31 AM
To address the bash of cycling, last summer while doing basically one ~4 hr ride/week, I also got up to my highest recent chinup total of 17 and was hitting 60 pushups for the first time ever. Burning those calories had me down to 185 from 195, and i hadn't been doing pushups or chinups as much. My son likes to "wrestle fight" which usually ends with him sitting on my back whille I do as many pushups as possible. At 185, I could do 20. At 195, 25 or 26.

My endocrinologist told me something pretty interesting: "If Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jared from Subway were the same height and the same weight, they'd have the same heart attack risk." Essentially saying that body composition doesn't mean anything, overall weight does.

Quite frankly, if running and biking were all I did, I'd be pretty bored, but they're the two that I do the most because of the magnitude of measurable impact those things have on my metabolism. (I'm type 1 diabetic on an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor, so I have immediate feedback on how different foods and activities affect my insulin sensitivity) While activities that push my heart rate above 165bpm eliminates the need for insulin and really drop my blood glucose, I can only do them for ~ an hour. This example is typical of doing an hour spin class three times per week.

Staying at 150bmp, (typically where I like to live for a long ride, although climbs will push me beyond that) I still need a little insulin to offset the glucose my liver dumps while exercising, but 6 days later after a 4 hour ride, I'm still needing less insulin. And, I can be outside. I don't get the same impact from splitting wood, climbing 14'ers, snowshoeing, any of it.

It isn't perfect, pushing too big of a gear will tear up your knees, and it's lacking the benefits of everything else for balance and hitting other muscles.

Life will kill you, boys, pick the poison that gives you the most joy. Sedentary life isn't.

robcollins
03-19-2013, 11:35 AM
Any of you that have dogs may consider this as it's worked out for me to fill the gaps in times where I don't have a lot of time to work out. One thing I'm consistently doing day after day is walking the dog. He loves to walk and doesn't care if it's rain/shine/snow/windy/etc. He's like the energizer bunny and can't stand to lose a race and neither can I.

We go out on a couple walks a day for a couple miles. I carry a pack with varying weight in it (nothing too heavy that I can't quickly jog) and I make him my pace maker on a static lead. Up hills, down hills, etc.

This exercises benefit is a couple-fold: Dog stays in shape, I get exercise, and I get an opportunity to dial in any gear in anticipation of hiking with it.

Just add a little resistance to your day to day activities.

Chasing our escaping Brittanies when I was a kid got me into running, and eventually a varsity letter in track in HS. It also got me a lot of quail and doves, but I'd never own another Brittany, hard-headed, and hard to live with unless they're being run about 4 hours/day...

widowshooter
03-20-2013, 09:13 AM
I don't have any dogs, but I do have two young girls that I chase around the house and backyard. I try to include them in everything I do so I don't have to try and balance so many activities and hopefully they enjoy it enough to start hunting and hiking themselves. Really, I just want them to be healthy and active and stay away from the TV and video games. They enjoy the kid friendly crossfit type workouts I make for them and really enjoy carrying their backpacks so hopefully we are headed in the right direction.