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sdnative13
11-09-2012, 03:36 PM
So I am looking at buying the KU5200 but first wanted to ask if anyone has experience with this pack under heavy loads. My main purpose to purchase this pack it to save 4-5 lbs. on the pack alone but am concerned about how it handles and carries under a heavy load such as backpack hunting while carrying out a boned out quarter or so, say total pack weight of 80-100lbs. Just curious how the light weight design of the pack will handle such load.

CrzyTrekker
11-09-2012, 05:34 PM
Might be apples and oranges to some extent but I carried elk quarters in my KU3700 this year. The pack out was about 2 1/2 miles cross-country from backcountry camp to Jeep, more like 3 total miles from the kill site. MY KU3700 did not just carry the weight, it carried the weight extremely well. Pack did not slip down from my waist, did not threaten to throw me off balance, did not cause any discomfort.

I don't have any other Kifaru packs but there will be more in my future.

sdnative13
11-10-2012, 08:39 PM
No that helping seeing as it is just a smaller version. Was you pack full at the time you carried out the elk. If you don't mind me asking how did you attach the elk to the pack. My current pack zips open and has a separate place to carry any meat away from all your other gear.

stid2677
11-10-2012, 08:48 PM
I have a KU5200 and it carries loads just fine in the range you mentioned. Just pack it in a way that the heaviest part of your load in centered on your back and NOT in the bottom of the pack.

2012 Sheep
http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r233/stid2677/Brooks%20Range%20Sheep%202012/P8110384.jpg

2011 Sheep

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r233/stid2677/Brook%20Range%20Sheep%202011/IMGP1626.jpg

CrzyTrekker
11-10-2012, 10:54 PM
[QUOTE]I have a KU5200 and it carries loads just fine in the range you mentioned. Just pack it in a way that the heaviest part of your load in centered on your back and NOT in the bottom of the pack. /QUOTE]

Agree with this. Center the heavy part on your back and close to your back.

I carried the individual quarters out one at a time. I loosened all the straps, put my gear (not all my gear, just gear that I always have on my person like a shell jacket) in the bottom, and then dropped the quarter into the bag and pulled all the compression straps down SNUG. I first put the quarter in a game bag and then inside a heavy duty trash bag to keep the KU3700 clean.

I have never boned-out the quarters, but will be doing so in the future. I think I can pack an entire elk out in two trips if I remove the heavy leg bones. Each of the two trips would include a hind quarter, front quarter, backstrap, tenderloin, some rib meat. I would have to make a separate trip for my camping gear. I know there are guys that can carry more weight - and with a KU5200 you could definitely do it - but I am not one of those guys.

sdnative13
11-11-2012, 03:11 PM
See that is my concern. Keeping my gear and pack clean when I put the meat inside. I saw that a gear chair is available so that might be another option. So many options its hard to choose

Sawtooth
11-11-2012, 10:32 PM
Good points offered so far! An entire boned out elk in two trips is quite a feat. My experience has been that it takes me four trips with a ~4K cubic inch Kifaru pack for a cow elk for the country I hunt in. It depends largely on the size of the animal, and the terrain and distance to be traveled, in addition to your own fitness. Like you said, there are guys who can carry more. I'm 130 pounds soaking wet...I cannot carry a 100 pound pack, or even a 75 pound pack in tall country. And I'm in shape. :D

CrzyTrekker
11-11-2012, 11:22 PM
An entire boned out elk in two trips is quite a feat.

Thinking about this some more and think you are right. I'm guessing the best I could do would be three hard trips for an entire boned out cow, maybe four trips for a bull. Don't know how much the leg bones weight, but probably not enough when removed to cut the number of trips in half. Hope I get a chance to debone an elk next year. :)

sdnative13
03-17-2013, 11:16 PM
I'm noticing that most of the kifaru packs are advertised as the bag only. So I assume one then has to buy a fame to attachable and carry the pack too. Is this also the case with the ultra lights models, more specifically the ku5200

BuckarooMedic
03-18-2013, 12:53 AM
@sdnative13,

No, all the KU packs have frames attached. Actually, the majority of Kifaru packs have the frames permanently attached to the pack bag.

sdnative13
03-18-2013, 11:34 AM
Maybe I'm not looking right but a lot of the bags under the hunting section are listed as bag only

Patrick
03-18-2013, 01:35 PM
sdnative13,

The "bags only' fit onto our Duplex Frames. Since the Frames can be used alone, and since they can also accept several different bags, it makes sense to sell the bags separately...alone if you will. Many men buy a Duplex Frame alone intitially, then come back later and purchase a bag for it. Or two bags over a period of time. Got it?

sdnative13
03-18-2013, 09:34 PM
I get that. I was just looking at it from a cost and weight point of view. I saw some other bags I liked but when having to buy the two systems separate I am finding it to be more expensive and heavier.

widowshooter
08-10-2014, 01:48 PM
How are you guys keeping the bottom of the KU pack from sagging? I loaded mine this morning with a 50lb sandbag and some blankets and it sagged about three inches below the waistbelt. Am I doing something wrong?

sab
08-10-2014, 07:29 PM
widowshooter:

I use rice for my training hikes, and I put the bagged rice inside the original hanging meat bag. Works very well!

Regards,
Scott

robcollins
08-10-2014, 07:49 PM
I built a PVC pipe ladder with clean out plugs at the top & filled it with sand. I've got a duplex frame that it fits on nicely with a military cargo panel & water, it weighs 55 lbs. It's most comfortable if the bottom sits at the top of the waist belt. I've added a 25 lb plate to that, but doing stairs at red rocks, my heart rate was quickly hitting 170+, after an hour, I was done. At 55 lbs, I can go all day adding a rifle & my Koala with a pistol & fishing tackle.

I think whatever 'pill' you come up with, the more fiddling you do with it, the more comfortable you'll be when it matters. In my Mollex, I've used 2 lock & Load #10s to hold 2 25 lb plates up high & cinched the compression straps to support those. Compression keeping your 'pill' up high, & tweaking for comfort is key...

mtluckydan
08-10-2014, 10:42 PM
Let's point out a difference between most ku3700's & a ku5200 - the waist belt is a heavier duty belt on the 5200 unless the ku3700 has been upgraded. There will be more comfort with the heavier duty belt. I have hauled some relatively heavy loads with my ku3700, but there becomes a point where the comfort level goes down. For me that is about 60lbs. I recently purchased a 5200, but haven't had the chance to haul a heavy load with it yet. For elk, I always bone them out and use the kifaru lightweight meat bags and/or the hanging meat bag inside the pack. If you want to keep your pack clean, a garbage bag as mentioned above is the way to go. They are lightweight and can be used for other chores and therefore are not bad to have along. If I am packing deer with the bone in I use the larger cloth meat bags inside a garbage bag. Also, in the above photos with the sheep notice the "grab it" helping support the load.

widowshooter
08-11-2014, 06:45 AM
Thanks for the info guys. I re-packed it yesterday and noticed that the higher I got the weight the better it rode. Getting it higher was a chore, but the hanging meat bag is a great idea, I will definitely have to look into that. I also have a KU 5200, but haven't used it for too much yet, I use my KU 3700 for just about everything. I like the PVC idea, I may also have to build one of those.

robcollins
08-11-2014, 12:27 PM
Thanks for the info guys. I re-packed it yesterday and noticed that the higher I got the weight the better it rode. Getting it higher was a chore, but the hanging meat bag is a great idea, I will definitely have to look into that. I also have a KU 5200, but haven't used it for too much yet, I use my KU 3700 for just about everything. I like the PVC idea, I may also have to build one of those.
With your packs, instead of the ladder frame, I'd recommend just doing tubes with a cap on one end and a cleanout on the other. 3 of those that are about 20-25lbs should fit just fine in the 3700, and you can dump sand or add water to tweak the weight. The ladder does help with lashing to the frame a bit, but you've got bags to do that, and the width of the ladder may make it clumsy to fit.

widowshooter
08-11-2014, 03:05 PM
Rob,

I was looking at PVC last night and thought that a couple to three singles would do much better than a "ladder". I like the cleanout on one end to enable the adjusting of more or less weight easier. I am also thinking about getting a hanging meat bag to put everything in as well. Thoughts?

robcollins
08-11-2014, 04:35 PM
Widowshooter,

I think the hanging bag idea is a good one. Any sharpness on PVC shifting around in there can wear, and more importantly, the hanging bag will allow you to adjust the height of your pills and get your weight transferred to the frame better if you do it right. A compression strap (or a few) around them will also stabilize, and you could incorporate them into using them instead of the meat bag while providing vertical adjustment. I think you're on the right track...

p.s. I like your handle, have done something like that once myself. Watched a nice 9-point circling a doe during rifle season in Missouri, after their 'magic' I was able to pop him, then her. :-) No remorse, they had their last 'meal', and made many for me & mine...

widowshooter
08-11-2014, 09:22 PM
I was thinking about the wear and tear on my KU as well. I have about six compression straps for the KU packs I own and I plan on incorporating them as well. I also want to integrate the cargo chair I have. I have carried one of kids in it, but that is all. Right now the cargo chair is in my pack, on the opposite side of the frame and the sand bag to "stabilize" the load a bit better. I carried the load of 50lbs in a sandbag this morning in this configuration, on top of a extra large pullout with my homemade superwoobie and another extral large pullout with my camp clothes in it. It kept the sandbag from sagging and the cargo chair framed the sandbag on one side with the frame on the opposite side. It was only a couple of miles, but it rode 10x better than yesterday.

widowshooter
08-17-2014, 12:48 PM
So I completely redid my load out for today's hike, and used my KU 5200 instead of the 3700 like I usually do. It was much easier to carry 75lbs in the 5200, than 50lbs in the 3700. (At least to me.) The load rode well, but it was a bit sloppy, so when I got home I decided to integrate the cargo chair like I wanted. I hook the chair to the pack, but I used the set of loops closest to the frame on the bottom outside of the KU 5200, so the pack actually rested on the cargo chair. I then loaded the pack with a 50lb sandbag, centered in the bottom against the frame. I put an XL pullout with my superwoobie in front of the sandbag. Then I tightened the bottom straps to secure it all. Once that was complete, I put the 25lb sandbag above that and my second XL pullout with all my early season clothes. Again, I tightened the top straps to stabilize the load. I used a lash strap to stabilize the load horizontally between the pack's two horizontal straps. Lastly, I pulled the lid over and strapped it down. Plenty of room to allow for more, but reality has to checked so I don't overload myself.

I made a video on my iPhone, but I fortunately I can't seem to upload it. Sorry about that.