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Kay9Cop
03-06-2011, 12:07 PM
I've been kind of a lurker on the site and haven't posted much, mostly because all the questions I had about gear I purchased had already been answered. Finally I have one that I haven't seen asked and answered before.

For big game packs I've always used an external frame so I could set a moose quarter on the shelf and strap it to the frame. I have had internal frame packs, but they've always been used for small game hunting or day packs. Now I'm considering the UL 5200 as my big game pack. I've seen posts about elk quarters inside the pack, but there's no way a moose quarter will fit inside. I'm from Alaska, so we have the big moose up here and rear quarters will go up to 125 lbs. on a big bull, but 100 lbs. is more average.

My question is can I strap a moose quarter to the outside of a UL 5200 with the Grab It and strap it down with the compression straps? I don't think it will slip out the bottom because a moose quarter is pretty wide, but will the straps be up to it?

Unfortunately, I've moved to a remote town in Alaska and don't have nearly the living/storage space I used to have. I'm having to down-size the amount of gear I have and I'm going down to just one pack. I sheep and caribou hunt a lot, so I know the 5200 will be just fine for that, but I don't have the space to keep a second pack just for my every other year moose hunt.

Take-a-knee
03-06-2011, 03:44 PM
I'd pick up a used Longhunter for moose, unless you are happy with your frampack. You need to get inventive with your storage system.

Kay9Cop
03-06-2011, 06:51 PM
I'm not disappointed with my frame pack, but it weighs about 9 lbs. empty and is 5700 cubic inches. It's a Barney's Freighter frame with the Hunter bag in kevlar. The long hunter drops a little over a pound and is very tempting, but not a big enough difference to justify dropping the $ for a new pack. The UL drops an amazing 6 pounds of my current pack weight. I'd definitely prefer the UL for all of the hiking I do and I can see spending the $ for that gain. I just need it to be able to haul a moose quarter on it like I've seen pictures of being done with the LH. I know the LH does it with the cargo chair, so I'm wondering if the Grab It can serve the same purpose.

I live in bush Alaska in a pretty small house. The town I live in isn't even connected to the road system and everything must be flown in or barged in during the summer when the ice pack recedes. Every square inch of real estate in my place is spoken for. I can't justify keeping two packs for the little bit that I'll be using the second. Maybe I'll just have to keep the frame pack, but I saw the info on the UL and thought it might be a nice weight savings.

colohunter303
03-06-2011, 07:22 PM
just curious why not bone out the meat. You can save 6 pounds getting an ultralight pack or you can save 20 ish pounds to take the bone out. hide too but I was assuming you already are removing hide. Also with that you wont need as much volume to carry one. I used to carry elk quarters out whole cause of the "convenience" of it being stiff and having the bone for structure. Then I boned one out and decided I will probably never quarter an elk again. its deboning from here on.

Kay9Cop
03-06-2011, 07:41 PM
just curious why not bone out the meat. You can save 6 pounds getting an ultralight pack or you can save 20 ish pounds to take the bone out. hide too but I was assuming you already are removing hide. Also with that you wont need as much volume to carry one. I used to carry elk quarters out whole cause of the "convenience" of it being stiff and having the bone for structure. Then I boned one out and decided I will probably never quarter an elk again. its deboning from here on.

Several areas in Alaska require the meat to remain on the bone in order to prevent wanton waste of meat. Usually it's quarters, ribs w/meat attached, neck meat, and tenderloins. Also a lot of times the meat won't be taken out right away, so the quarters must be hung to air and cool and hanging them from the bone is much easier than when they are boned out.

colohunter303
03-06-2011, 07:46 PM
Duh I knew that. sorry brain fart. To really answer your question. a grab it and an additional strap or two around the top is what i do for the first load on my late season. for every load after that i use an EMR (LH) hauler with cargo chair and xstrap kit. it is as good as it gets for quarters.

Take-a-knee
03-06-2011, 07:57 PM
Why don't you build yourself an elevated cache like the old sourdoughs did? Sounds like that is what you really need anyway as remote as your site sounds. That is where I'd want my pack, loaded and ready to go. If I lived where you live, and had a Barney's frame pack, I'd keep it. Get a KU 5200 for everything but moose, but keep the Barneys.

Kay9Cop
03-06-2011, 11:15 PM
for every load after that i use an EMR (LH) hauler with cargo chair and xstrap kit. it is as good as it gets for quarters.

This sounds like it would be the best option for hauling quarters with a Kifaru pack. Now I have a couple more questions I need to research or post to get an answer.

Thanks for the help.

snakey2
03-07-2011, 10:50 AM
I have hauled a full bone in Shiras hind quarter on the cargo shelf of a Spike Camp. Though not "comfortable" it was far from terrible and was about as good as I could imagine it to be under the circumstances. A long hunter would be better because of the size and suspension system and would probably be "easy".

Kay9Cop
03-07-2011, 10:58 AM
I have hauled a full bone in Shiras hind quarter on the cargo shelf of a Spike Camp. Though not "comfortable" it was far from terrible and was about as good as I could imagine it to be under the circumstances. A long hunter would be better because of the size and suspension system and would probably be "easy".

Thanks. I think this is the way I'm going to go. I'm thinking a LongHunter hauler with some long pockets attached.

Vek
03-07-2011, 12:59 PM
A boned moose hindquarter will slip *just* barely into the open top of a Dana Longbed bag. That's a relatively large opening. I can't comment on the UL's opening size, but I'd bet it's smaller.

To me, the UL sounds like the ultimate mountain hunting pack...for anything but moose. What does your bare barney frame/harness weigh? That's a more fair comparison weight-wise to the UL in a moose situation. At the very best, a bone-in AK moose with no cape is six trips. Count on eight if the walking is lousy.

Kay9Cop
03-07-2011, 01:15 PM
I usually do it in 8 trips (4 because I usually have a partner). I've given up on the idea of hauling a moose quarter with an UL. My girlfriend also needs a new pack, so there may still be a UL in the future. She can haul the neck meat, back meat, and cape in the UL and I'll haul the quarters on something else. :)

Take-a-knee
03-07-2011, 01:25 PM
I usually do it in 8 trips (4 because I usually have a partner). I've given up on the idea of hauling a moose quarter with an UL. My girlfriend also needs a new pack, so there may still be a UL in the future. She can haul the neck meat, back meat, and cape in the UL and I'll haul the quarters on something else. :)

Well, there you go. The KU packs accept several different stay lengths and of course, you can change the waistbelt size. A KU 5200 would get used by both of you.

Ken
03-08-2011, 10:40 AM
I guess this thread brings up the question of...does a standard cargo chair fit on an UL pack? If so, the UL should haul quarters as well as a G1-G2 Longhunter/EMR.

colohunter303
03-08-2011, 02:04 PM
I am sure you are gonna here from the pack gods mel and patrick that it wont fit. The only advantage of the cargo chair is it is a little taller and is solid which IMO helps squish the meat up tight to the frame. The grab it is equally matched in carrying capacity if you ask me. You aint gonna break either of them before your gonna break yourself. I have put my 165 lb brother in both of the set ups on the hauler and on the late season with both cargo chair and grab it on both. Neither chair nor grab it even budged nor felt any more comfy. the hauler obviously takes the cake though over the late season. For hunting purposes the grab it is un matched the things it can fully envelope is endless and its frameless design lets it act similar to the hood on a LH, ZULU, EMR, MMR, ZXR, etc. you can put anything under there. The chair, Being rigid and taller holds large bulky items better if you ask me but being stiff also sticks out behind you if you cant get it fully cinched around what its carrying which isnt good when hunting. After the animal is down though, it is the best solution for carrying big heavy chunk of meat hide and antlers.

Kay9Cop
03-08-2011, 03:20 PM
When looking at it initially, my thougthts were that the grab it would wrap nicely around the hip joint end of a quarter and then I could lash the knee joint end. Mostly I was concerned about the tear strength of the new fabric having the majority of the weight of a big quarter in a relatively small area on the grab it. Sounds like it's not a problem with the fabric of the Longhunter.

Anyone know how much a LH hauler weighs without a bag? I haven't been able to find the weight of just the hauler on the web site.

Lizette
08-12-2011, 04:42 AM
I agree that long hunter would be better.

jhuebner
08-14-2011, 10:19 PM
Kay9Cop,

I think the weight of the Longhunter hauler is 6lbs. 8oz; it's hidden on the hauler page. I am currently running a bit of a hybrid; an EMR hauler with a longhunter bag and an XTL lid. I pieced this together over a year and it works well. I would probably agree with the above posters that this would be your besto option for a moose quarter. Additionally, I've used just the hauler with some pods and an E&E which also worked real well. Initially it may seem like a lot of weight, but the dern packs ride so well once you get the fit dialed in, that it becomes a moot point. You'll be happy with the hauler no doubt! Here's a picture with my son's first elk this past year in Colorado...you can see what I used.

Forgot to add that if you go with the ultralight stays you'll save another 9 oz, which puts you under 6 lbs. for the hauler.

6720

Uncle Jake
09-07-2011, 07:18 PM
Hopefully, I will have some pics of me hauling moose quarters in my ZXR in about a week and a half!

Kevin Dill
01-01-2012, 07:12 PM
Resurrected this thread, as I have a particular interest in packing moose meat. My partner and I journey to Alaska every September and spend a couple weeks up there chasing moose with our longbows. We fly in via Super Cub, and it's a very spartan hunt. In the past 4 years we've killed 3 bull moose and 1 bull caribou. All of these animals got the full bone-out treatment, as the meat was flown out by plane. All of the meat has been carried out on our backs...and that's a considerable bit of poundage. My last bull fell 3/4 torturous mile from the camp. The country was tough enough that we transported the meat out in 3 stages. One stage was walking through a wet strip of tussocks that can destroy an ankle or knee quickly. The 2nd stage required a tough water crossing through an ice cold rapids. Stage 3 was a long hike with multiple shallow water crossings and much up-down work. Each load was in the 80-100 lb range.

My pack was an MMR Platform Hauler using a Load Sling to secure the bag of meat. I'm no rookie to this game, so I had the pack adjusted for good fit. I will provide details if requested, but the setup just didn't work for me like I hoped. Those big blobs of meat are so hard to get secured and balanced. After a few loads I tried my partner's (inexpensive) aluminum frame hauler which I was sure would be a joke on my back. I came to finally understand that for repetitive very heavy loads of soft meat in ungodly terrain, the external frame wins the day. I've been over this issue a dozen times with moose hunters of much experience. A large majority use external frames and prefer them. I now see why that is so. Hauling a moose out on one's back is a matter of controlling very heavy loads with as little pain as possible. It's about loading up and unloading easily with minimal fuss, and it's about having something to GRAB hold of when you're dealing with the load. Carrying out a mature Alaska bull moose head is a special treat...or torture...depending on the pack. Nothing can provide the lash points and stability as well as a rigid external frame pack.

I realize that moose backpacking is its own specialty in a way. I think the OP's choice of a Barney's Freighter frame was spot-on for the rigors of hauling 500-800 pounds of meat and head. Think "flatbed truck" and you have the picture.

7880

alaskalanche
01-02-2012, 02:43 PM
Kevin,

I agree about hauling moose quarters is straight work on big bulls for sure. I have hauled some considerable weight with the Barney's. However, I struggle to get the waistbelt tight enough with triple digit loads by the end of the season. Granted I go from 160ish to 145 pounds on my 5'9 frame towards the end of the season. :D

So I got a cargo hauler to use in conjunction with my Longhunter frame. All up the setup weighs in at 6 pounds. The cargo hauler being 13 oz. I can get the waistbelt tight enough with ease on the longhunter so that is nice and it fits me a bit better. The barney's is really tough to beat, but I like the Kifaru pack fit enough to give this a whirl. Gonna try to get my wife a cow moose in the coming couple weeks in a non-motorized area that is currently -30 right now so I am glutton for punishment. If successful I'll let ya know what I think of how it carries the weight.

Kevin Dill
01-02-2012, 05:01 PM
I follow your thoughts. My moose hunting partner is built like you, while I'm a 6' 200+ kind of guy. Different packs are often the end result. I remember how totally convinced I was that the MMR Platform setup would be the bomb. The suspension is simply incomparable on it. One issue I had with huge meat loads was the heavy lumbar pad rubbing my back to soreness...felt like somebody spun their tires across my back. I also found the external frame to be much quicker to load and secure those 100+ pound sacks of meat. The infinite number of tie-off points is convenient when hauling large racks. I'll be interested to know how your setup works out for you, as I hope you get several good tests in the coming seasons.

Finally, I'll note that little compares to the Kifaru system for backpacking. I love just about everything in the offerings, and I do have another pack purchase planned. I believe the chore of moose packing is one of those things which will demand that you find the best pack for your needs, or continue to pay a "heavy" price.

7894

sab
01-02-2012, 06:15 PM
One issue I had with huge meat loads was the heavy lumbar pad rubbing my back to soreness...

Kevin - I had the same problem with my MMR, and it turned out to be the shape of the stays. Once I discovered this, I removed them and re-bent them to match my back shape. The difference was unbelievable! If you still have your MMR, you might try removing the stays and holding them up to your back. If the bottom of the stay is an inch or more from your back-side, a custom bend will do wonders for you.

Regards,
Scott