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FoldersUnite
01-25-2011, 07:13 PM
Hi all,

I've got a small stove that I love using. One question though, when I'm finished burning I will dump out the ashes and call it good. Packing it in the stove bag keeps everything else in my pack clean.

Is there any other action I should be taking to ensure long lasting stove performance? I don't want it to rush prematurely because I don't do anything but empty out the ashes.

Thanks all.

Any other tips would be appreciated too!

Levi
01-25-2011, 08:50 PM
Foldersunite,

Glad to hear you are enjoying your small stove. I do the same thing as you do...empty the ashes and store it in the Kifaru provided storage bag. Just make sure the stove and parts are dry before storing the stove when you get home from a trip, and you will be good to go.

Levi

Herb
01-25-2011, 09:18 PM
My reply not so much with care, but use.

I swapped the gloves for a pair of leather gloves. They come in handy around camp and with handling HOT stove parts. We've broke camp camp plenty of times when that stove still has some heat(hot coals) and leather gloves get put to use extracting the stove from the shelter to dump and extinguish the fire. The stainless steel cools quickly, the legs hold heat for a while.

Ermine
01-26-2011, 05:30 PM
I have handwashed my stove with soap to get it really clean when not using it.

LesA
01-26-2011, 08:00 PM
I have handwashed my stove with soap to get it really clean when not using it.

You really have to be dedicated to hand wash a stove. I bought my Kifaru Stove back in Aug of 07 and only used a horse to roll on it and I use it at least four or five times a month and I still don't think I could every fine time to hand wash a stove. It will look great for year to come though. :)

Ed T
01-26-2011, 08:01 PM
I have handwashed my stove with soap to get it really clean when not using it.

Not sound disparaging, but I am wondering why?

Dale Lindsley
01-26-2011, 09:27 PM
One good reason to wash your stove is if you use your stove near salt water. You should wash and dry it afterwards, especially the pipe foil and all the disassembled leg hardware. I used my 8-man for a few days kayaking in B.C. and now I have pin holes in my stovepipe, probably from burning driftwood. Also, all 8 nuts rusted to the legs. I have since bought stainless nuts, but that doesn't solve the pipe issue. It's not much fun to unpack your stove at you're campsite and find the hardware all rusted together.

Smokepole
01-27-2011, 05:19 AM
[QUOTE=LesA;252652]You really have to be dedicated to hand wash a stove. QUOTE]

All depends on how much and what you cook on top of it. I recall finding one (rather parts of one, strewn all over) that had been used to fry fish on, and then been cached.

Sawtooth
01-27-2011, 07:28 AM
I don't do anything special with mine after use. Sometimes I take a handful of grass and scrub the inside of the panels to keep ash out of the stove bag, and I always tap the screens for the same reason.

Smokepole
01-27-2011, 08:27 AM
I rest my case.

Ermine
01-28-2011, 07:27 AM
The reason I handwashed it was because we live in america and I can do what ever I want to. lol just kidding.

Handwashing is not needed, I just mentioned that I did it once. Basically because I was coped up in a house and bored. Made it all shiny and purdy looking.

Kmassaro
01-28-2011, 02:42 PM
You're more industrious than I am. I'd just throw it in the dishwasher.

colohunter303
02-04-2011, 10:00 PM
Shake it out and wrap it up is the usual protocol. I do always seem to spray it off with the hose at the same time I spray off my tipi and thats only when the tipi gets muddy after a good rain or snow.

Dreadnaught
02-05-2011, 09:59 PM
What about the stove pipe? I am wondering how you all clean it after a burn. I don't want to roll it up and get ash and soot on the clean side so I usually wipe it down with a wet nap and then dry that off with a towel. It then rolls up nice and clean with no need to worry about a mess the next time I roll it out. I am concerned with rust and or general degradation from the wetness. I have not had my stove long. Do they hold up pretty well against rust? As far as the rest of the stove, I just shake out the ashes, match the dirty sides with their counterparts and put it back in the storage bag.

Smokepole
02-05-2011, 11:08 PM
The soot is pretty dry and powdery in my experience, so I just grab a wad of dry grass or pine needles or whatever's handy and wipe the soot off with that. It crumbles and comes right off, dry.

bark-eater
02-06-2011, 04:51 AM
I cleaned my roll up chimney at the car wash. I had a month of creosote built up, less a couple good chimney fires.

LesA
02-06-2011, 09:23 AM
If you want your stove pipe clean just build the fire up. It will clean up fine and then do what Smokepole said. Itís stainless and going to take a lot of abuse from fire and water. Kifaru equipment is made to be used and has no problem holding up to being used. When itís worn out, just call Kifaru and they will sell you any part youíre looking for. The stove pipe is only about $100 which by the time you need one it should have paid for itself in service for many years of camping. (

bark-eater
02-06-2011, 10:00 AM
If you want your stove pipe clean just build the fire up. It will clean up fine and then do what Smokepole said. It’s stainless and going to take a lot of abuse from fire and water. Kifaru equipment is made to be used and has no problem holding up to being used. When it’s worn out, just call Kifaru and they will sell you any part you’re looking for. The stove pipe is only about $100 which by the time you need one it should have paid for itself in service for many years of camping. (

Well thats what I was thinking when the chimney fire got going. And now I've got some nice pin holes to glare at.

Woods Walker
02-06-2011, 02:26 PM
I hand wash my stove after the trip but this is more of an OCD thing.

Patrick
02-06-2011, 02:56 PM
Hello gents,

Just for the record, I personally don't do anything at all re "maintainance" of the stoves. I just pack 'em up and head home, deploying 'em again next time I'm rambling. The gloves are in the kit to protect one's hands from soot--if you care about sooty pinkies. "Chimney fires" are simply the result of stoking the stove plentifully--flames coming out the top of these stoves is standard and no cause for alarm at all, and not indicative of a fire in the flue pipe. If there are pinholes in the pipe it is likely the result of salt contamination. Avoid seaside driftwood and cooking salty foods directly on the stove.

Legions of these stoves have been in service for well over twenty years, with nary a rust-out or burn-out. It's stainless steel. Don't worry about it. Unless you just hanker to, as does dear friend Woods Walker. Fiddling with 'em won't hurt either, if that's what you like to do.

Ken
02-06-2011, 03:52 PM
You've got OCD Kevin?

bark-eater
02-06-2011, 04:56 PM
I'm stick'n with my story..... The pinholes are in the Tipi, and wouldn't have happened if I hadn't let her rip.. I stuck my head out of the tipi to yell "Check this s**t out!" He just pointed up and the flame was roaring out the pipe and drawing little creosote fireballs with it. I got about 6 pinholes before I got the damper shut. It should be noted that neither the stove or pipe during this incident were Mountainsmith or Kifaru products, but this prior experience leads me to be a little cautious about letting creosote build up in my Kifaru chimney.

Woods Walker
02-08-2011, 09:40 AM
You've got OCD Kevin?

Go Figure? LOL! The pipe mostly self cleans when rolled up. Beyond wanted my gear looking good before heading out there isn't a reason to do much of anything with the Kifaru stove.

Woods Walker
02-08-2011, 09:42 AM
I'm stick'n with my story..... The pinholes are in the Tipi, and wouldn't have happened if I hadn't let her rip.. I stuck my head out of the tipi to yell "Check this s**t out!" He just pointed up and the flame was roaring out the pipe and drawing little creosote fireballs with it. I got about 6 pinholes before I got the damper shut. It should be noted that neither the stove or pipe during this incident were Mountainsmith or Kifaru products, but this prior experience leads me to be a little cautious about letting creosote build up in my Kifaru chimney.

I think your issue may have to do with the fuel. What type of wood did you burn?

bark-eater
02-08-2011, 02:06 PM
I was burning a mix of stuff scavenged from burn piles and dry fire wood poached from my buddys wood pile. I was spending a full month in the tent and was trying to keep a smoldering fire going all night so that I would maybe have some coals in the morning. I was also trying out an idea from Calvin Rustrum, that involved a t section of pipe with a perforated tin can as a "flap damper" of sorts above the main damper. So I was producing a lot of cold smoke over a long period, and subsequently a lot of creosote.

Woods Walker
02-08-2011, 09:10 PM
I was burning a mix of stuff scavenged from burn piles and dry fire wood poached from my buddys wood pile. I was spending a full month in the tent and was trying to keep a smoldering fire going all night so that I would maybe have some coals in the morning. I was also trying out an idea from Calvin Rustrum, that involved a t section of pipe with a perforated tin can as a "flap damper" of sorts above the main damper. So I was producing a lot of cold smoke over a long period, and subsequently a lot of creosote.

I tend to open the damper up before turning in so never had that issue before.