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View Full Version : E&E as "bellypouch"



Lone Wolf
10-25-2009, 04:53 PM
I use my xray, containing all the essential gear needed, when travelling abroad 1-2 times/month.

Earlier I also used to have a small shoulderbag for all the stuff I need easily accesible, like water, snacks, a book....etc. I travel by train and ship. And walk from trainstation to harbour. But it was a bit unpractical with the shoulderbag when on the move.

Then I came up with this idea to use E&E clipped to the shoulderstraps of the backpack and carried on the belly.

Itīs not a very "pretty" set-up but it works and quite comfortable. The E&E doesnīt contain anything very heavy. Something like 2kg at the most.

Of course it swings when walking but I keep it steady by holding on to it with my hands. Have yet to come up with a way to attach it to the waistbelt of the xray.

Hope the pictures are clear enough.

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/7682/kifarumagsck0019769727.jpg (http://img10.imageshack.us/i/kifarumagsck0019769727.jpg/)
http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/7137/kifarumagsck0039834616.jpg (http://img195.imageshack.us/i/kifarumagsck0039834616.jpg/)
http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/9127/kifarumagsck0029878232.jpg (http://img195.imageshack.us/i/kifarumagsck0029878232.jpg/)

cpti
10-25-2009, 09:12 PM
Makes me....claustrophobic, but it looks like it worked for ya. I'd say a G2 malice claymore would be an even better option for you, as it's smaller and has better access and superior internal compartmentalization.

AbnMedOps
10-25-2009, 09:36 PM
Somewhat reminiscent of an abandoned Natick project from 15-20 years ago. They experimented with putting approx 60% of weight on the soldier's back, and approx 40% on the front. Testbed was a modified ALICE rucksack, with frame, and a smaller bag on the chest. I only saw one or two pictures. Apparently the walking ergonomics/decreased energy consumption numbers showed much promise, but they never worked out details of making it practical for a soldier.

Problems likley included: method of attachment; donning; emergency bail-out; overheating/lack of ventilation, going prone;

I think that, starting from a highly functional waist belt (such as Kifaru), this concept might be made workable as a cargo hauler, though maybe not for combat use.

straps
10-25-2009, 11:14 PM
I do the same thing without the extra webbing.

I travel with an E&E and a larger pack, and prefer just to throw the E&E straps over my shoulders (so that the E&E is on my chest) then don the larger pack.

The E&E stays put and its flat straps make the combo surprisingly comfortable.

Lone Wolf
10-26-2009, 02:22 AM
I do the same thing without the extra webbing.

I travel with an E&E and a larger pack, and prefer just to throw the E&E straps over my shoulders (so that the E&E is on my chest) then don the larger pack.

The E&E stays put and its flat straps make the combo surprisingly comfortable.

As a matter of fact I have tried that too. But didnīt like it because couldnīt take E&E off without taking backpack off. But youīre right, it was a comfortable way of carrying.

AndyL
10-26-2009, 02:29 AM
do you have a pals belt?

If so you could get a bit of webbing and 4 slotted SRBs simply slot the buckles onto the pals on the belt and the lowest place on the E&E, unclip to remove the pack.

Lone Wolf
10-26-2009, 02:31 AM
Yes, I have an unpadded pals-belt. Thank you for the tip. :)

rambler_wannabe
10-26-2009, 09:50 AM
I used grimlocks or real 'biners from the top loops to the D rings. And a little heavy-duty elastic for the bottom straps that AndyL described.

It works much better on a bigger main pack so the load lifters help pull the weight off the shoulders.

Lone Wolf
10-26-2009, 10:31 AM
I used grimlocks or real 'biners from the top loops to the D rings.

Tried that but D-rings are too far apart for the narrow E&E. It pulled shoulderstraps together in a funny way.

But i solved problem how to attach to the pals belt. Used webbing and silkclip and buckles.

Lone Wolf
10-26-2009, 01:31 PM
Pictures of the webbing for attaching for E&E to pals belt.

http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/3806/kifarumagsck0045228853.jpg (http://img197.imageshack.us/i/kifarumagsck0045228853.jpg/)
http://img111.imageshack.us/img111/7403/kifarumagsck0055324742.jpg (http://img111.imageshack.us/i/kifarumagsck0055324742.jpg/)
http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/6421/kifarumagsck6405824.jpg (http://img301.imageshack.us/i/kifarumagsck6405824.jpg/)

Lone Wolf
10-26-2009, 01:54 PM
:o Oops! Sorry, double post.

BuckarooMedic
10-27-2009, 08:29 AM
Lone Wolf, why don't you just utilize the E&E shoulder straps over the main pack straps, instead of your complicated set-up? Put your main pack on and then just put your E&E on "backwards". I used to carry my aid bag this way, many moons ago, when I was with the light infantry.

andyoz
11-06-2009, 05:08 AM
I do the same thing without the extra webbing.

I travel with an E&E and a larger pack, and prefer just to throw the E&E straps over my shoulders (so that the E&E is on my chest) then don the larger pack.

The E&E stays put and its flat straps make the combo surprisingly comfortable.

I've tried mounting a chest or belly pouch onto my ZXR (and other packs) straps when travelling. To be honest I was never happy with any arrangement and just went back to having the bag on the front under my big packs shoulder straps.
When travelling the small pack has my "urban" survival tools/passport/money etc so that's the thing a want to keep on me and main the pack going to get dumped every time I board a plane/bus/sit down.

If you have a molle belt I'd just hang a couple of 2Qt pouches off it, lots of capacity and accessable. I tend to have a roll up dump pouch on my wait belt to give me handy storage/quick extra space if I'm not carrying an extra bag.

Out in the hills I tend to have an old PLCE respirator bag, much like a BOB on my front. Easier to sling to the side if I have to scramble up something and protects the contets quite well (padded). Couple of fastex buckles on it and rear of my belt/pack so I can clip it away one handed.

Lone Wolf
11-07-2009, 02:51 AM
Final report. Am now abroad and have tried my "pack-tuning" for real. Works just like I hoped it would, so I am pleased. Very easy to use, xray on the back, pick up e&e and click it to the upper buckles and then the lower buckles. Very simple. Gives me no claustrophobic feeling at all. :)

Mr Yarrow
01-09-2010, 12:49 PM
OK, I give in! Please can you explain in small words to me where the 1 inch webbing is threaded?

It appears to go through the slider above the chest strap, but I cant work out where the end at the top goes, the one with a 3 bar on it.

Sorry to be a ludite, but I still cant get my head round all the buckles and bits on my Kif kit :rolleyes:

Rgds

Lone Wolf
01-09-2010, 01:06 PM
1.It appears to go through the slider above the chest strap, but I cant work out where the end at the top goes, 2.the one with a 3 bar on it.

Sorry to be a ludite, but I still cant get my head round all the buckles and bits on my Kif kit :rolleyes:

Rgds

1.Yes, you are correct.

2.End of 1.5 inch webbing with 3-bar goes under the 2 inch 3-bar.
But it was a pain in the *ss to get it there.
Not much room for 1.5 inch 3-bar to fit under 2 inch 3-bar.

Hope this made any sence. Sorry, canīt explain any better in words. :o

Mr Yarrow
01-09-2010, 02:34 PM
1.Yes, you are correct.

2.End of 1.5 inch webbing with 3-bar goes under the 2 inch 3-bar.
But it was a pain in the *ss to get it there.
Not much room for 1.5 inch 3-bar to fit under 2 inch 3-bar.

Hope this made any sence. Sorry, canīt explain any better in words. :o

I think thats clearer, thanks mate.

Will get my pack out tomorrow and have a look along side your pics and try and work it out as I go along, the explanation about the 2 inch 3bar helps alot :)

Rgds