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oldpinecricker
07-28-2009, 03:45 AM
Hunting is getting more and more lame and more folks from neighboring Washington state are flooding into my state of Idaho to use public lands and it's resources. Our rivers are crowded and access points are overused. It just isn't worth following the yearly changes in the game reg and the time/cost/money/effort just to hunt an animal which are not overly numerous.

I still gather skill set and informaiton in bushcrafting and have been forging out my own knives, along with using primitive weaponry for small game hunting. Oh yes, I still hunt longrange steel plates with rifles, but the game is safe from me these days.

Heck with hunting and all the effort. Think I'll stick to chasing gals and driving my new bad apple high horse power Cadillac. It's a lot more fun and far less effort.

It's just odd how your tastes change over time.

scothill
07-28-2009, 05:18 AM
I can appreciate what you are saying to a degree. In addition to being busy with work and homework during college, competeing with out of state hunters on foot in CO helped make it easy to not hunt. I am guessing it was in large part where we were going, but the hoards of other hunters crawling over the areas usually on horse back was just not something I was willing to deal with.


What caddy?

Huntsman22
07-28-2009, 05:22 AM
The caddy that 'zigs'?........

ryanusmc
07-28-2009, 06:22 AM
I'll take hunting over chasing fillies any day of the week. My deer per hunt average is much higher.

FlatbowMB
07-28-2009, 06:33 AM
Find a pretty filly that loves to camp, hunt & fish, then hang on to her. It's not Utah, you only need one.

bamboobow
07-28-2009, 06:36 AM
Hey Old Pine, I feel for you…. Here in Illinois public land is crowded. Trophy deer hunting has done us in. A lot of non residents hitting our public land competing with residents who have lost access to private land because of leasing……

I bow hunt for tree rats locally and plan at least one, if not two, week long out of state trips for deer. I can still spend a week in the badlands of North Dakota without seeing another hunter. In my growing years I’ve finally slowed down enough that I don’t put a lot of emphasis on the taking of the animal, it’s the whole journey I enjoy.

My second trip this year is a first time elk hunt to the Weminuche Wilderness in Colorado. I guess I’m slowly becoming that dreaded non-resident hunter myself……:)

I can’t help but notice two things you stated…

Heck with hunting and all the effort & It's a lot more fun and far less effort.

We don’t have the wilderness here, that you have in the western states; It’s hard for me to imagine you can’t get away from the crowds. I say get out there and find some……
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RD Martin
07-28-2009, 09:19 AM
I feel your pain....there are a load of Amish guys from over here that head your way every year for elk. Then again we get hit pretty hard over here during rifle season. It just confirms my affection more for Archery season.

Timberline
07-28-2009, 09:20 AM
Preferences can and do change with many people, particularly if you’ve worked yourself into a rut with anything. Nothing wrong with that. Move on. Have fun.

I’ve come to believe that part of the trick to staying with any activity for a really long time is to mix things up. Avoid getting in a rut. With big-game hunting, that’s fairly easy. Hunt different places, different animals, different ways and with different weapons. One way is to simply try hunting with centerfire rifles, muzzleloaders and bows (compounds and also traditional bows). Each offers different seasons, challenges and rewards. If you’re stuck on centerfire rifles, then try hunting with a really old and classic rifle. I recently acquired a 1949 Savage 99EG in .300 Savage that I plan to hunt with a good bit with this fall, and I’m excited about that. Should be fun and rather romantic.

Mix things up to stay with anything.

Tim in Washington
07-28-2009, 10:59 AM
Timberline,if you work up any loads you like for your Savage would you be willing to share them?My son has two 300 Savages and would like to use them on elk but we are not impressed with factory loads.Tim

snakey2
07-29-2009, 10:01 AM
Buy some land then you don't have ANY crowds!!!

Smokepole
07-30-2009, 01:13 PM
To each his own, I like Timberline's advice but haven't had to use it yet. I think if you go for the archery or muzzleloader seasons as others have pointed out you can find uncrowded hunting on public land. As far as it being too much work, it all depends on how you define "work." For me anyway, hunting doesn't seem like work, not nearly as much as chasing fillies would be. Admittedly, I'm out of practice in that realm.

GlennGTR
07-31-2009, 05:38 PM
I guess it could happen but just not to me. I plan on hunting until Im covered in dirt and probably after as well. I guess if heaven is the perfect place then it will always be fall there for me with frosty mornings, colored leaves and blue skies. Game will be tough to get but abundant and all will be trophy grade critters lol. My cure for the over crowded blues is to keep searching for areas that get little to no traffic. I love road closure areas and wilderness. There is still a lot of ground that a horse cant cover and a lot of guys unwilling to leave the comfort of a warm truck cab and thermos of coffee. I actually try to encourage road hunters because it keeps them away from me and the game.

Pointshoot
07-31-2009, 07:34 PM
Sorry to hear youve dropped hunting, but nothing wrong with following your own priorities. One of the reasons I've come to this forum is to learn more so as to try to escape the crowd behind the 'barriers' of lots of rugged miles & hard work needed to be a backcountry hunter. Yeah, its crowded . . . where everyone else goes (obviously!)

If its easy there's gonna be a crowd. If not, its gonna be a helluva lot of 'work'.

But time and priorities change all the time. Right now I'm not doing much fly fishing like before. Too many other commitments. Will probably only do the annual fishing trip with my brother and buddies this year. I do plan to hunt big game in the fall though. Regards, - -

Prowannabe
07-31-2009, 07:48 PM
Hunting is getting more and more lame and more folks from neighboring Washington state are flooding into my state of Idaho to use public lands and it's resources. Our rivers are crowded and access points are overused. It just isn't worth following the yearly changes in the game reg and the time/cost/money/effort just to hunt an animal which are not overly numerous.

I still gather skill set and informaiton in bushcrafting and have been forging out my own knives, along with using primitive weaponry for small game hunting. Oh yes, I still hunt longrange steel plates with rifles, but the game is safe from me these days.

Heck with hunting and all the effort. Think I'll stick to chasing gals and driving my new bad apple high horse power Cadillac. It's a lot more fun and far less effort.

It's just odd how your tastes change over time.

I pray the day never comes that I feel the same as you. Sorry to hear it's taken it's toll.

Don Browning
08-01-2009, 08:29 PM
I'm having a hard time wanting to be in the woods during deer season where you might run into any other person. For this reason I try to go farther and higher that anyone in their right mind, but this is hard in my crowded state (GA). If I do run into someone in the steep and brushy, it's far more likely it'll be someone I respect and like. I'm really liking getting back to my roots, squirrrel hunting on land that deer hunting is closed on. I have been fortunate enough to go on several out of state big game hunts, and my favorite have been goat hunts in SE Alaska, just because just no one else is out there doing this. I also tried owning some land once, but it was getting hunted during the week by locals, and no matter what I planted or how hard I worked, someone else was always there.
It seems that every thing that was simple and pure and fun, now has a crowd, an administrator, a support group both pro and anti, a tax, a rule, a lawyer, or it hurts too much anymore!
Don

kutenay
08-02-2009, 04:30 AM
I still love hunting and am fortunate to live in B.C., among the premier hunting areas on the globe. Some years I get out more than others and I am not overly concerned with killing an animal, as we can only consume a little bit of meat, given my wife's health-related diet issues.

But, while last year just was a bust due to my almost destroying my vehicle on an Elk hunt near my hometown, this year is looking good, with both a northern BC Goat hunt and an Kootenay Elk hunt planned with my buddy. He has the Goat draw as I did not bother to put in this year and I will have Moose, Elk, Mulie and Whitetail tags and all of these are in season at the time, Sept 13-29, that we are going.

By next year, I will be going on a long and likely solo flyin for Elk and Stone's Sheep and Moose are all over the area....but, I ain't young and moving a Moose is a BIG job, for one guy.

I still have meat from last year, 2007 and 2006 to finish, so, as usual, I will only kill what I can use and follow Joan Baez's advice, "take what you need and leave the rest".

Smokepole
08-02-2009, 06:36 AM
Kutenay, shame on you for not giving credit to your fellow countryman:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Night_They_Drove_Old_Dixie_Down

"The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" is a song written by Canadian musician Robbie Robertson, first recorded by The Band in 1969 and released on their self-titled second album."

kutenay
08-02-2009, 10:37 AM
Yup, RR wrote it, probably under the influence of "Rompin' Ronnie Hawkins" aka "The Hawk" a helluva musician from Arkansas, IIRC, but, JB sang it and I was a helluva lot more attracted to JB when we were young, back in the '60s.

Good to see that SOME "remember" the '60s, quite a few do not, eh!

Speaking of which, I see that Gordon Waller of "Peter and Gordon", one of the "British Invasion" groups just died at only 64......damm "rock 'n' roll" seems to kill them off pretty young, sad to say.

evanhill
08-02-2009, 08:12 PM
There is one really easy cure -- forget the hunting part of getting out there.

Most backpackers only hike during the summer months when the "fast and light" gear they got from REI is suitable, and most hunters are only in the woods during the relatively short big game seasons.

Choose *any* other time of the year, and you've got the woods to yourself. Go shoot some small game for the pot or some varmints or just some pictures and have a ball.

Hunting is an important sacrament, but is certainly not the only (or even the main) reason to be in the backcountry.

mountain_mulie
08-13-2009, 10:28 PM
Hunting is getting more and more lame and more folks from neighboring Washington state are flooding into my state of Idaho to use public lands and it's resources. Our rivers are crowded and access points are overused. It just isn't worth following the yearly changes in the game reg and the time/cost/money/effort just to hunt an animal which are not overly numerous.

I still gather skill set and informaiton in bushcrafting and have been forging out my own knives, along with using primitive weaponry for small game hunting. Oh yes, I still hunt longrange steel plates with rifles, but the game is safe from me these days.

Heck with hunting and all the effort. Think I'll stick to chasing gals and driving my new bad apple high horse power Cadillac. It's a lot more fun and far less effort.

It's just odd how your tastes change over time.

I guess I'd be one of those folks. Public lands mean public for idaho residents only? Last I checked these states were all part of the same country and don't worry.....your state of idaho is one of the most expensive states to hunt for non-residents, I'm sure the money I pay to hunt there goes to good use with idaho fish and game (along with the gas and grocery stores on the way). From what I've heard, they may be moving towards a points system in the future so you might be a little more up beat.

As others have eluded to, not too difficult (in idaho especially) to do some research and use those legs to get away from the "crowds". “The key to success is often the ability to adapt”

Have fun chasing gals in that Caddy. At some point you might have to get out of the car to talk to 'em......I hope it doesn't lose its luster for ya.

Otoejet
08-14-2009, 10:10 AM
Evanhill,
Sound advice, indeed. Nothing quite like having the woods to yourself in those "uncrowded" times. A walk in the woods will always do you good.

It's not so much about the harvest for me...maybe because it's never been a great ratio. I have a stretch of private land I'm lucky enough to hunt turkey and deer on. I usually put meat in the freezer there, and the harvest is nice. With that said, my soul just isn't as happy there as when we hit the mountains for Elk season. I haven't harvested an elk yet, and at times that gets frustrating. Hell, if you hike your 8-10 miles a day, don't you deserve one? NOPE, and that's OK. Last fall, for various reasons our area was very, very crowded. I spent more time seeking solitude than elk sign...and I think what I was hunting in the solitude is the reason I hunt. It's the peace I find in nature. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to set the sights of the .270 on a nice piece of Elk flesh, but if not I'll take the cold mornings and campfires with the pards.

As far as changing it up as Timberline talked about. I'll be heading to Wyoming for my first pronghorn hunt this fall. It has me searching new loads, new techniques and expanding my hunting repetoire.

There's always time for time in the woods.

oldpinecricker
08-15-2009, 11:41 PM
It's been great lately as few folks are on trails or remote areas. As long as it's pre-arhchery and general game season I'll be out and about in the woods.

When our hunting season comes I'll stay home and practice with an recently aquired traditional recurve. The discipline for the more traditional weapons has me interested.

As for the STS-V Cadillac, it's been upgraded with stainless exhaust, ECU, supercharger intake and cyclinder heads. Suspension will be tweaked next, but even now it's quite an evil ride.