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mig
02-21-2006, 01:33 AM
I have been using Garmin GPS for a while and recently purchased the three of the RINO 530, it is a UHF radio and GPS combination, and Garmin swears that it has a 5 watt output, I know it operates in the 400Mhz range from the manual, and wanted to know if anyone had any experience with the actual effective range of this item and influencing factors, all the hand helds I have used before were VHF 5 watt output in the 150 to 200Mhz range. To be honest I kind of doubt Garmins integrity in the tuning of the devices. I have had limitted opportunity to test the range, especially unobstructed. Or just anyone who really understand the UHF vs VHF diffeerence in characteristics.

thanks

Nathan C
02-21-2006, 04:50 AM
We had some of the older versions issued to us during train-up. Can't tell ya the difference between UHF/VHF only that they kinda sucked. If you had your GPS on as well, the voice was very disorted even from somebody right next to ya. Even if the range was decent, which I don't think it was much, it sounded like you were underwater. The newer models are suppose to be alot better though.

polak187
02-21-2006, 11:08 AM
Hey new guy here. I used Rino 120s on ski slopes and river while kayaking... They carried for about 2 miles on the river but they sucked for anything else. ALso the quality of sound already mentioned above was not the greatest. Hope that helps,

Matt

imported_Scott Cunningham
02-21-2006, 03:33 PM
I have a 130, and love it, but rarely use the radio. If you want a radio, get a decent 7 mile FRS radio. If you want the GPS, with the utility of the FRS (and excellent scan feature).

One thing I do use a lot is the terrain database from the TOPO USA series. I work in the desert, and do a lot of night operations in limited visibility. While I can navigate just fine without a GPS, having the garmin is a huge time saver.

Nathan C
02-21-2006, 03:42 PM
Another thing to think about if your military, I got my Garmin E-trex to pick up a signal inside a 1025 much easier and better than the issued Rhino's. Don't know why, but it did. And in M1114's you can forget any GPS except an installed plugger.

Good once dismounted though. Love my Garmin.

straps
02-21-2006, 04:39 PM
Re: GPS in M1114--Get a GPS with an external antenna fixture. Garmin makes a magnetic external antenna. Best place to put it to prevent interference from other EMR sources is the center of the lower front windshield sill. The cable is long enough to wind it once around the front mirror and then through the door, which is gasketed softly enough not to pinch the cable at all.

Those of you pending a trip to the box: STAY AWAY from Radio/GPS combos. If you don't know why you'll be told soon enough.

Sigo
02-22-2006, 03:35 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Originally posted by Scott Cunningham:
I have a 130, and love it, but rarely use the radio. If you want a radio, get a decent 7 mile FRS radio. If you want the GPS, with the utility of the FRS (and excellent scan feature).

One thing I do use a lot is the terrain database from the TOPO USA series. I work in the desert, and do a lot of night operations in limited visibility. While I can navigate just fine without a GPS, having the garmin is a huge time saver. </div></div>FRS, if you stay within the law, is limited to .5 watt and a fixed antenna. No legal FRS will get you 7 miles range. GMRS on the other hand might. However, a license is required for GMRS use, again if you want to stay within FCC rules.

imported_Scott Cunningham
02-22-2006, 04:36 PM
Yep, and I'm sure everyone signed up for the GMRS license.

I turn the radio of the Garmin off. It isn't what I bought it for. It had the biggest LED screen.