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Hutch
05-30-2007, 10:04 AM
I searched the forum, but couldn't come up with an answer.

I am wondering if the ParaHootch has any external loops on the top to secure it to trees or whatever without a pole kit. Foe an example, those that are familiar with catenary cut tarps, you can secure both the front anf back to a tree and not use any poles. BAsically a loop or securing point at the point where the poles would be on the outside of te tarp.

Thanks
H

Hoogster
05-31-2007, 02:58 AM
You might be able to put something like a smooth stone where the pole would be and tie the rock in with a rope. Use that as an anchor point and tie it to a tree or ridgeline etc. I just purchased a paratarp and am going to try it. Many years ago some archery guys from Michigan were using this method on a heavy duty visqueen. It worked great. I was impressed.

Hutch
05-31-2007, 08:47 AM
Cool, so it doesn't have any...bummer.

Hoogster, we used to call that method an "indian button." You can use a small pinky sized stick about 1" long as well. Just twist it up a bit and then tie away. The small stone works well also.

Thanks
H

Hoogster
05-31-2007, 04:01 PM
Didn't know what it was called but that visqueen held up great.
But I think nix on the external loops.

Mel
05-31-2007, 05:09 PM
Hutch, the ParaHootch does have external loops on top where the Hypalon pole mounts are.

Mel

Hutch
05-31-2007, 05:45 PM
Nice!!!!
Thanks

H

TR
05-31-2007, 07:24 PM
Hutch:

I have a Super Tarp, which is the big brother of the para. I find that I get a tighter, sturdier pitch when I use an internal pole as opposed to a top tieoff. The pole also makes a good support to secure the stove pipe if you use a stove with the tarp, as well as a nice place to hand a lantern from, etc.

I use a top tie off when I use the tarp as a roof over my hammock, but when tough winter weather moves in, a stout pole is good insurance and serves a variety of functions.

Woods Walker
05-31-2007, 07:34 PM
How well does the ST act as a hammock tarp? Forgot that the ST had a tie off above the pole mount but think I remember Ksnake posting a photo of it. How much coverage does the ST offer above a HH? Think I remember some photos of it being used as a hammock tarp. I seen both the ST and Paratarp set up side by side at the ECR and believe you made the right pick on the ST. The Paratarp looked a bit small for normal camping etc. HH rocks too. Used mine more times than I can count.

Hutch
05-31-2007, 07:35 PM
TR,
Yeah I totally agree, I am just looking for the versatility of having a means to tie it off as well.

Thanks guys for the replies.

H

TR
05-31-2007, 08:35 PM
WW:

The ST works pretty good for a hammock tarp. It's got plenty of length, but you can get wet in a severe blowing rain unless you've chosen your campsite carefully and take into account prevailing winds.

I know from personal experience that the weather is much more unpredictable in the mountains than down here in the South. Down here, it's either raining every afternoon, doesn't rain for a month or tornadoes are a real possibility. In any event, you know at least a week in advance what your up against. Also, 90% of the time the rain moves from west to east here (Missisippi blows and Georgia sucks, so Alabama is caught right in the middle as usual), so you can set up the ST at an angle to block the wind and rain.

I had a para, but sold it cause I'm too old to be wiggling in and out of tight spaces and wanted more headroom. The ST is my perfect shelter.

Having said that, my take on the ST as hammock tarp are as follows:

1) With the ST, I can go to ground in severe weather and have a bombproof shelter.

2) It will work well above a hammock for typical rain showers and dew; although because it's a shaped tarp, it requires a little more time to string up and adjust.

3) In severe weather, with sideways blowing rain, know your weather patterns and pay attention to your campsite location. A sheltered locale saves a lot of tarp square footage.

If you are a hardcore hammock hanger who wants to swing in a sideways blowing gale, get a Mac Cat or other catenary cut tarp dedicated to hammock use. Hang your hammock 12 inches off the ground and tie your tarp down tight.

If you want a rock solid winter shelter that can be used with a stove and cover 80% of your hammocking needs - the ST fills the bill.

Ksnake
06-01-2007, 02:56 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Woods Walker</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Forgot that the ST had a tie off above the pole mount but think I remember Ksnake posting a photo of it. </div></div>

Yep, works great!

http://home.comcast.net/~ksnake/Kifaru/tarptree.jpg

http://home.comcast.net/~ksnake/Kifaru/tarprope.jpg

Ksnake
06-01-2007, 03:03 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: TR</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I had a para, but sold it cause I'm too old to be wiggling in and out of tight spaces and wanted more headroom. The ST is my perfect shelter.
</div></div>

I agree, the para is a nice survival shelter, and I take it in my day pack. But I prefer the ST for comfort. And the weight difference is negligible, so it's more than worth it for the space you get.

Hoogster
06-01-2007, 06:07 PM
I just set up my almost new paratarp a bit ago. Seems like plenty of room for one guy. The 8Man was way too much room for one so I decided to trade with Dave R. for a Paratipi and the paratarp. The paratipi has alot of room, not sure which one to use. I suppose I will alternate between the two so I can figure each one out.

Hutch
06-04-2007, 09:27 AM
Ksnake,
That's exactly the pic I was looking for. Thanks!

H